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Wecome to Read the Bible together in 2020!

DEUTERONOMY 27-34
Psalm 113-119

This final section of Deuteronomy focuses on ratifying the covenant, the blessings associated with its keeping and curses resulting from disobeying God’s commands. Moses entrusts the book of the law to the elders and priests before reciting a prophetic song, blessing the 12 tribes, commissioning Joshua as the new leader and dying on Mt. Nebo.
1. How does the heart help one to love God and keep his commandments (30:11-20)?
2. What future predictions about the nation of Israel are made in these chapters?
3. What does this section say about Moses? What makes him unique as a prophet (34:10)?
4. Which passages in the Psalms encouraged you the most this week?
Extra: click to see
Advice for reading Deuteronomy:
Fee and Douglas

DEUTERONOMY 14:3-26:19
Psalm 106-112

The reading this week begins by reviewing the law which was previously given at Mt. Sinai. It elaborates on the release of debtors and slaves, the 3 required yearly feasts, the need for legal justice, standards for true prophets, purity in worship, guidelines for kings,  the care of the weak and defenseless and the tithes and offerings God expects.
1. What reasons did God give the Israelites for keeping his commandments?
2. How does idolatry keep one from wholeheartedly loving God (Deut 6:5-9)?
3. Why were the Israelites only to offer sacrifice in places designated by God?
4. Which of the Psalms encouraged you the most this week?
Extra: click to see
Advice for reading Deuteronomy:
Fee and Douglas

Deuteronomy 2-14:2
Psalm 99-105

This section recalls how God  provided victories over Og and Sihon, but refused to allow Moses to enter the Promised Land. It includes an admonition not to change God’s law, warnings against idolatry, the command to love God with all of one’s being, not to adopt pagan practices of other peoples and to worship God only in places which he designated.
1. What reasons did God give the Israelites for keeping his commandments?
2. How does idolatry keep one from wholeheartedly loving God (Deut 6:5-9)?
3. Why were the Israelites only to offer sacrifice in places designated by God?
4. Which of the Psalms encouraged you the most this week?
Extra: click to see
Advice for reading Deuteronomy:
Fee and Douglas

This section recalls how God  provided victories over Og and Sihon, but refused to allow Moses to enter the Promised Land. It includes an admonition not to change God’s law, warnings against idolatry, the command to love God with all of one’s being, not to adopt pagan practices of other peoples and to worship God only in places which he designated.

Numbers 28-36; Deuteronomy 1
Psalm 91-98

The final chapters of Numbers describe various offerings, vows to God, the division of plunder after Midian’s conquest, and the settling of the tribes east of the Jordan. The establishing of borders and refuge cities signals a looming entry into the Promised Land.
1. What lessons should the Israelites have learned on their journey so far?
2. Why was Moses concerned about the tribes who wanted to settle east of the Jordan?
3. What is the significance of the cities of refuge?
4. How were you encouraged by your reading in the Psalms?
Extra: click to see
Advice for reading Deuteronomy:
Fee and Douglas

NUMBERS 16-27
PSALMS 85-90

This week’s reading starts with a rebellion against God’s chosen leaders of Moses and Aaron. The Edomites then block the Israelites’ journey, the kings of Arad, Sihon, and Og are defeated by Israel, and Balaam blesses Israel. Israel is corrupted by sin in Moab, the fighting men in Israel are numbered, and Joshua is confirmed as Moses’s successor.
1.     What does this section say about the kind of leaders that God chooses and uses?
2.     What factors lead to Israel’s military successes?
3.    What kind of trouble does Israel fall into on their journey? How does God deal with their sin?
4. How were you encouraged by your reading in the Psalms this week?
Extra: click to see
Advice for reading Numbers: Fee and Douglas
Bible Project overview of Numbers

NUMBERS 5-15
PSALMS 78-84

This week Numbers begins with a series of purity laws, gifts to the Tabernacle and the departure from Mt. Sinai. However, things quickly go wrong as the Israelites complain about their circumstances, rebel against Moses and are fearful after spying out the promise land.
1. How do chapters 5-9 speak to the presence and worship of God?
2. What do you think is the driving force behind Israel's complaining in chapter 11? How is 11:24-30 a picture of our pride?
3. How could two groups of people see such a different future in the promise land, chap. 13-14?  What were the consequences?
4. What thought from the Psalms encouraged you this week?
Extra: click to see
Advice for reading Numbers: Fee and Douglas
Bible Project overview of Numbers

LEVITICUS 24:10-NUMBERS 4;
PSALMS 71-77

Leviticus gives instruction on how to be holy. Numbers is a book of divine discipline and shows the nation of Israel going through a painful process of testing and maturing.
1. What observations can you make in Leviticus 26 about the results of obedience and disobedience and the role of confession?
2. What does Lev. 27 teach us about the cost of consecration?
3. Watch the Bible Project overview of Numbers. What did you learn from the overview?
4. What thought from the Psalms encouraged you this week?

LEVITICUS 11-24:9; PSALMS 64-70

In between the laws of clean and unclean, and the holiness code is the important instructions concerning the Day of Atonement. An amazing ceremony sometimes called a five-act drama.
1. In Leviticus 16 we find the Day of Atonement instructions. Can you identify the five acts to this drama?
2. If you had been in the crowd on the Day of Atonement, what would have impressed you the most? Compare this to what Jesus did.
3. What would you have felt if you had been in the crowd on the Day of Atonement when the goat disappears over the horizon?
4. What thought from the Psalms encouraged you this week?
Extra: click to see
Five act drama chart!

LEVITICUS 1-10; PSALMS 57-63

God desires to live with Israel, but even Moses is unable to enter the Tabernacle. How can Israel, with all their moral corruption, become God's covenant partners to bless the nations? Leviticus answers this questions in three surprising ways. (Bible Project)
1. How do you see the offerings to God reflecting His holiness?
2. What are the main differences between the offerings in chapters 1-3 and the offerings made in chapters 4-6
3. What lessons can be learned from the failure of Aaron's sons Nadab and Abihu chap. 10?
4. What thought from the Psalms encouraged you this week?

EXODUS 34-40; PSALMS 50-56

This week we find Moses ascending the Mountain of God for a second set of tablets to be made because he broke the first. Moses' face glows bright upon his descent and many people contribute in the making of the Tabernacle. The book ends with the glory of the Lord filling the Tabernacle and Moses unable to enter into it.
1. What does this week's reading reveal about the nature of God?
2. How would you explain Moses' radiant face? Compare with 2 Corin. 3:7-18
3. What did you find interesting about the process of building the Tabernacle?
4. What is the significance of Moses no longer able to enter the Tabernacle in chapter 40?

EXODUS 21-33; PSALMS 43-49

The giving of the law with its centerpiece of the Ten Commandments (ch. 20), followed by the Book of the Covenant (chs. 21–24). These laws together focus on Israel’s relationship with God and with one another, the latter as an expression of their living out God’s character in those relationships. (How to Read the Bible Book by Book)
1. Chapters 21-23 contain forty-two judgments, what was the purpose of these laws?
2. Chapter 24 is the ratification of the Covenant with God. How did the people respond? What was Moses' role, what did he do and why?
3. What was the purpose of the Tabernacle and the purpose of its elements?
4. While Moses is atop Sinai receiving instructions for the place of Yahweh’s dwelling among them, his brother is below, leading the people in constructing and worshiping idols (32:1–26). How does this happen? How might this become a paradigm for the future life of Israel?

EXODUS 10-20; PSALMS 36-42

Last week we closed the book of Genesis and opened the book of Exodus. After 400 years of slavery, Israel cries to the Lord and he hears their cry and sends a deliverer to rescue them. The journey out of Egypt is filled with drama, expectation, disappointment, complaint and provision.
1. What do the plagues teach us about Pharaoh's heart and God's plan?
2. What did the various elements of the Passover meal mean and why was this important for the Israelites to remember?
3. How could your disappointments in life be God's divine appointments?
4. What role were the Ten Commandments to play in the people of Israel's lives?

Fun Fact: Did you know the same Hebrew word for slave also means to serve and to worship?
Israel served Pharaoh, but would soon be freed so serve/worship Yahweh.


GENESIS 49 - EXODUS 9:35
PSALMS 29-35

The story of Joseph ends with his death in Egypt and the book of Exodus begins with an echo of God's blessing to be fruitful and multiply. This first part highlights Israel's need for deliverance from Egypt and God's preparing a deliverer.
1. How is God's past dealings with Israel going to be important in their present situation?
2. The Hebrew women did not obey Pharaoh's command of death.  How do you reconcile obeying those in authority with what the midwives did?
3. Why did Moses, in chapter 2, the deliverer of the story, fail so miserably?
4. What are some excuses we make to avoid following God's call? How were Moses' excuses overcome?
Fun Fact: Did you know that each of the 9 plagues corresponded to an Egyptian god?
Click here to see chart

GENESIS 36-48; PSALMS 22-28

The story of Joseph continues the theme of God's blessing in the births and prosperity in Egypt; and the themes of good and evil come to a firm conclusion in the outworking of this story.
1. Where do you find God's people complicating his program by their failure, or refusal to fulfill their responsibilities?
2. How is Joseph's temptation and resistance to it in chap. 39 instructive for believers today?
3. What role does faith play in the midst of difficult and discouraging circumstances?
4. How does one avoid abandoning their faith when they find success?
Bonus: Name the three sets of dreams that are symbolic, and the four sets of parallel relationships involving Joseph?
Answers: 
Three sets of dreams: 1. Joseph's. 2. Cupbearer's and the baker's 3. Pharaoh's
Four parallel relationships:
1. Joseph and his family
2. Joseph and Potiphar's house
3. Joseph and the prisoners
4. Joseph and Pharaoh's household

Genesis 24-35; Psalms 15-21

God promises to bless the world through Abraham's family, despite their repeated failure.
Welcome to Read the Bible together 2020!
To help you get the most out of your reading, we have provided some questions you may like to use. Also, keep in mind these three simple steps.
1. Read
2. Reflect
3. Respond
1. What are the repeated failures in the family of Isaac?
2. In what way does Jacob's life of deception come back to affect him?
3. What was the significance of Jacob's wrestling match in chapter 32?
4. God initiates the wrestling match while Jacob was alone
-When's the last time you were really alone?
-How can being alone help you more clearly hear the voice of God?

Genesis 13 - 23; Psalms 8-15

This week we are introduced to Abraham, to whom God promises to restore humanity to a place of divine blessing, somehow, through this family. God even makes a covenant with Abraham to make it clear he will not go back on his word. This week, we will learn more about Abraham and the early descendants of his family line.
Welcome to Read the Bible together 2020!
To help you get the most out of your reading, we have provided some questions you may like to use. Also, keep in mind these three simple steps.
1. Read
2. Reflect
3. Respond
1. What repeated patterns of faith testing do you find in week 2?
2. What are the significance steps in Lot's move toward Sodom?
3.  In what ways do you find it hard to trust God for the future?

Genesis 1-12; Psalms 1-7

God creates a good world and commissions humans to rule it, but they choose rebellion again and again.
Welcome to Read the Bible together 2020!
To help you get the most out of your reading, we have provided some questions you may like to use. Also, keep in mind these three simple steps.
1. Read
2. Reflect
3. Respond
1. What repeated themes did you observe?
2. What does it mean to be made in God's image ?
3. Where is God's grace found?
4. In what ways do you find it still hard to trust God as the first humans did?